3 BLACK WOMEN ARTISTS AND 1 HAIRSTYLE THEY SHARE IN COMMON

Everyday I have a new interest and I totally blame this on the fact I really do think I can do anything or be anything I chose to do / be depending on my mood. From fashion to design to being a dj and even an art etc, you bet I’ve tried to explore them all. Speaking of art, I found these 3 black amazing women on Instagram and I’m in awe of each one and the work they are doing especially in a male dominated industry. What however struck me the most about them is how stylish they are and ‘sleek low bun’ hairstyle that connected all three of them together for me.

The Women…

1. Sarah Owusu

Her Work

Sarah was born in London, United Kingdom in 1991. She studied at the University of Essex, earning a BSc (Hons) Psychology. Owusu is a self-taught Ghanaian British artist. After years of painting, she soon identified her own unique style. Using acrylic and mixed media, at the base of Sarah’s work lies very striking, colourful and exuberant strokes as a way of expression. Primarily focusing on portraiture, across her work, you will also find assertion of both her Black and African-ness primarily through her choice of subjects.

Her bright, abstract and sometimes distorted portraits of herself, prominent figures continue to help reclaim Africa’s rich history, culture and heritage. She paints those who have helped to shape history particularly Black and African history, the young and the old which often tell a story. She explains, “God is the most famous, talented and creator of all creations. I may be the one holding the brush, but it is He who executes it all.”

More here

The Hair – Style

2. Amy Sall

A graduate from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Arts & Sciences, Amy Sall holds a master’s degree in Human Rights Studies, concentrating on the right to development and youth empowerment in Sub-Saharan Africa. She received her BA in 2012 from The New School University in Culture and Media Studies, with a concentration in Cultural Studies and a minor in Journalism.  Sall is Founder and Editor-in-Chief of SUNU: Journal of African Affairs, Critical Thought + Aesthetics (SUNU Journal), a forthcoming publication seeking to amplify emerging voices and perspectives on matters and ideas concerning Africa and the Diaspora. From 2016 to 2017, she was a Part-time Lecturer in the Culture and Media Studies department of The New School University’s Eugene Lang College, where she developed and taught two courses: Third Cinema & The Counter Narratives, and The African Gaze: Postcolonial Visual Culture of Africa & The Social Imagination. She is a 2016 Independent Curators International (ICI) + RAW Material Company Fellow.

Aside from her academic and entrepreneurial pursuits, Sall also collaborates with fashion and beauty brands. She has collaborated with and has been featured in campaigns for brands such as J. Crew, Armani Beauty, Chloé, MANGO and Kenzo. She has also been featured in publications such as Vogue, Glamour, W Magazine and Kinfolk.

More here

The Hair – Style

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Life hits different when you bet on yourself 🦋

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⛅️ @mango #mangogirls • ph. @maisonludi

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🍢 @mango #mangogirls ph: @mariemesall

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3. Na Chainkua Reindorf

Her Work

As a Ghanaian-born woman artist, I find that engaging with textiles provides a unique path toward (re)claiming agency in self-expression. In my work, I examine the histories of West African textiles, focusing specifically on their significance to a particular region, how they have been constructed, what they are used for and what sorts of materials are used in making them. I am also interested in taking apart the values assigned to these textiles, often defined by gender and as belonging to the domestic sphere; in practice that means literally taking apart the textile itself so that it exists as a sum of its parts. These parts are what I reinterpret by employing a range of materials that I then use to construct and reconstruct what becomes my work.

More here

The Hair – Style

Like the bob hairstyle is to women CEOs, think Michelle Obama, Oprah etc, it’s safe to say the sleek back low bun is to women in arts. I honestly wish this was an interview with these women but I know very soon the opportunity will present itself. I hope you enjoyed this and have discovered new women to Stan because the whole aim of this post is to show off women who through merely knowing them on social media has inspired me. I have also just created a new Instagram page TheSisterviews where I’d be hosting interviews via Instagram live and also in writing in the coming days, do check it out and follow so you don’t miss out. Lastly, I hope you enjoyed reading this, don’t forget to share too.

Love always…

2 thoughts on “3 BLACK WOMEN ARTISTS AND 1 HAIRSTYLE THEY SHARE IN COMMON

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